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Charges Announced for Four Arrested in Lilburn 'Pill Mill' Operation

The four defendants each face a maximum statutory penalty of 40 years in prison and a fine of up to $2,000,000.

(Editor's Note: This article was originally published January 28, 2013.)


See updates to this story:

Jan. 31, 3:20 p.m.: Lilburn 'Pill Mill' Suspects Post Bail

Jan. 29, 11:30 a.m.: Initial Hearing Set for 'Pill Mill' Defendants

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The U.S. Attorney's Office released Monday details regarding the arrests of four individuals suspected of running an illegal pain clinic in Lilburn.

Those indicted and arrested on federal drug and distribution charges were:

  • Larry Webman, 64, of Florida, an owner of the facility
  • Randy Webman, 59, of Florida, an owner of the facility and brother of Larry Webman
  • Dara Webman, 29, an office manager and the daughter of Randy Webman
  • Dr. George Williams, 45, of Duluth, who is suspected of writing suspicious prescriptions for patients

According to the U.S. Attorney's Office, the four suspects were indicted on Jan. 22 for "illegally selling and distributing prescriptions for opiate-based narcotics and other controlled substances to addicts and drug dealers under the guise of a pain clinic."

Additionally, they were charged with unlawfully distributing drugs near a school. Berkmar High School is immediately adjacent to the parking lot where the pain clinic, Premier Medical Management, Inc., is located.

The U.S. Attorney's Office announcement comes just days after a raid on the Lilburn pain clinic, located at 3993 Lawrenceville Highway, Suite 101. Drug Enforcement Administration agents, members of the Gwinnett Metro Narcotics Task Force, as well as the Lilburn Police Department descended on the clinic on Jan. 24.

The following day, Lilburn Police Chief Bruce Hedley spoke to Patch about the department's involvement. "My No. 1 priority was to dismantle that illegal enterprise and shut them down because they're doing nothing but spreading poison in our community," he said.

"Unscrupulous doctors illegally exploiting their license to prescribe controlled substances represent an increasing source of deadly illicit drugs in our communities," United States Attorney Sally Quillian Yates said in a press release. "The storefronts from which these criminal enterprises operate threaten the safety of our children and the security of our neighborhoods."

Suspected Operation Ties

According to the U.S. Attorney's Office, the pain clinic was operated illegally since February 2012. About that time, the city of Lilburn issued a moratorium on pain clinics in attempt to get ahead of other such businesses.

In the indictment, Larry Webman and Randy Webman are accused of managing and controlling the clinic, but deferring to Williams on prescribing large amounts of narcotics. Officials suspect that Williams was "routinely prescribing controlled substances outside the course of professional medical practice and without legitimate medical purposes."

In addition, Dara Webman is charged with handing out Williams' prescriptions to customers in exchange for cash payments.

According to federal officials, the clinic saw as many as 60 customers daily and received $250 to $350 for office visits. Patients were "almost always leaving with a prescription for controlled substances, which often included oxycodone, a highly addictive painkiller," officials said in a press release.

After brief, initial visits, officials suspect that patients received additional prescriptions -- pre-signed by Williams -- for controlled substances. "Almost all customers paid cash, and Larry Webman and Randy Webman personally oversaw the collection of the clinic’s receipts," officials said in a press release.

As many as 95 percent of the patients came from outside of the state, Lilburn's Police Chief said. States included: Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida.

Property Forfeiture Sought

On the day of the raid, law enforcement officials collected evidence, including office records and interviewed patients present.

Now, federal authorities seek forfeiture of all property used in and derived from the operation of the Lilburn pain clinic and Williams’ license to practice medicine. A gynecologist, Williams studied at both Meharry Medical College in Tennessee and Wayne State University in Michigan, and has been licensed since 2004.

"The dispensing of addictive prescription pain medication under the guise of a doctor’s care, as occurred in this investigation, is not about the good of the community or an individual’s specific health needs; it is about greed," said Harry S. Sommers, the Special Agent in Charge of the DEA’s Atlanta Field Division. "Make no mistake; those involved in 'pill mill' activity are in fact drug dealers."

In addition to the aforementioned agencies, the Internal Revenue Service also worked on the investigation of Premier Medical Management.

Each defendant faces a maximum statutory penalty of 40 years in prison and a fine of up to $2,000,000.

See also:

John Q Public February 02, 2013 at 02:36 PM
So these billionaire gangster wanna-be businessmen who own most or all of mainstream media contribute their drug money cash to both political parties, (that way, regardless of who wins they come out on top), whose campaigns then spend the lions share of these proceeds back in the media advertising their favorite fair-haired boy up for election, and this same billionaire boys club gets most of their money back in huge profits for the media, and they get their black market cash laundered in the process, more control of the political system, and more control over the minds of everyday Americans who honestly don't know what or who to believe anymore. They just know something in all this doesn't seem righteous but, not knowing the details, simply shrug their tired shoulders and move on. These gangsters operate under the philosophy that the average John Doe really wants someone to tell them what to think about who and why...so they proceed to employ the best pundits and editors to ensure us Americans only hear what they want us to hear...and everything else then becomes "conspiracy theory" or some such bullshite. But I challenge the good people of Lilburn, Ga. to take a long hard honest look at the statistics related to the cost their paying, with the safety of their children and security of their communities, in allowing alcohol free reign in their economics. If they will do this and compare those stats to such stats relating to pain meds, it becomes a no-brainer. Case Closed!
John Q Public February 02, 2013 at 03:13 PM
Oh, let's not overlook this beaut of a spin: "The dispensing of addictive prescription pain medication under the guise of a doctor’s care, as occurred in this investigation, is not about the good of the community or an individual’s specific health needs; it is about greed," said Harry S. Sommers, the Special Agent in Charge of the DEA’s Atlanta Field Division. "Make no mistake; those involved in 'pill mill' activity are in fact drug dealers." At least this guy isn't afraid to address the real issues, the only problem being he is placing the onus of such on the wrong doorstep...and he damn well knows it. My doctor/patient relationship is none of his damn business, but I'm not afraid to share that experience with anyone who might care to listen. Dr. Williams was my pain management doctor for almost a year. In that time he changed my treatments four different times to help me find a regimen that worked for me. In my long grueling experience with my condition this kind of attention was a godsend. But, by far, the most help I received at Premier was from physical therapy. Now my records are missing and my condition remains...untreated. I have to start all over again trying to find a doctor like Dr. Williams and a physical therapist like Earl and I seriously doubt that will happen any time soon. But the issue should be about the community and the health of individuals...and that is what makes this a travesty of justice! Power drunk idiots like this Summers cat.
John Q Public February 02, 2013 at 03:14 PM
"The dispensing of addictive prescription pain medication under the guise of a doctor’s care, as occurred in this investigation, is not about the good of the community or an individual’s specific health needs; it is about greed," said Harry S. Sommers, the Special Agent in Charge of the DEA’s Atlanta Field Division. "Make no mistake; those involved in 'pill mill' activity are in fact drug dealers." Well Mr. Summers...it takes one to know one, doesn't it...boy.
ron luks May 08, 2013 at 07:53 PM
I know people who went there for illegal drugs and their lives were ruined. They lost everything after they got hooked.
Lee Henderson July 01, 2014 at 07:37 AM
Ron you are an IDIOT, prescription medications are LEGAL. If you friends ABUSED their medications and ruined their lives they were IDIOTS. You are most likely a shill and a liar. The fact was pharmacies wouldn't fill the prescriptions that most people obtained there for years before this sting operation because of illegal intimidation from the DEA. They didn't like seeing poor uninsured people getting legal prescriptions rather than drinking the alcohol or using the illegal heroin that the government was shipping in and allowing the prison industrial complex to make millions off nonviolent offenders or killing themselves with those dangerous substances before they got old enough to receive Social Security. I bet the clinic refused to submit to the bribes the cops demanded to allow them to operate.

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